Saturday, April 2, 2011

The etymology of LOL

Two questions:
1. If you're someone who writes LOL, do you actually laugh out loud when you use it, or is it more of a smile type of thing? If it is a smile, there's a perfectly good emoticon for that, you know. :) Or even :P if you're feeling feisty. But I seriously doubt that most people who write LOL in their texts and emails do laugh out loud.
2. If you, like me, enjoy saying "LOL" out loud to amuse/slightly mock the preteens and teens in your life, do you says "loll" or "ell-oh-ell"? I like saying "loll" but perhaps that is incorrect. But even if it is, I probably will keep saying it.
A third bonus question:
3. Who came up with LOL, anyway? Was it someone who honestly laughed out loud and felt the need to communicate that rather than text/email "hahha, I just laughed out loud!" or instead of "haha"? These are the questions on my mind at the moment, so you know it must be a Saturday!

1 comment:

  1. (I'm posting this on my sister's behalf, as she couldn't post it herself on my blog for some reason I will have to look in to. The following was written by Sarah Lowe, herself a teen.)

    Regarding the students trying to write TTLY, LOL, or OMG.
    The fact that they have been put into a dictionary is an insult to the English language. Don't get me wrong, I support insulting the English language in some ways, because English can be stupid. We have no rules that ever actually apply. Even the rule that rules don't apply doesn't apply! However, English is our language, so we pretty much just have to deal with the stranger aspects of it. You don't have to want to, you just have to do it. These are not words! They are abbreviations. When you are asked to print your name, would you put JNE CK or would I put SRA LO? Of course not! So when asked to explain why you chose an answer or conclusion should you write b/c? NO! I can accept some abbreviations in certain things, like note taking. If a teacher is talking fast and you have to keep up in notes, by all means write b/c or w/. But in writing, unless you are trying to get a certain point of the character out, never write abbreviations. Some stories may include a text message section, in which case fine. But NEVER in expository form should any abbreviations be used. So why did people start using these in the first place? I have two theories. The first and shorter of the two is to avoid having to learn to spell words. "Laugh" is by no means a hard word to learn to spell, but still people insist on making it L in LOL. The second theory is sheer laziness. People are getting lazier and lazier when it comes to the english language. At first it was mixing up the nominative and objective forms of the few words in English that actually decline. For goodness sake, people, there are about five words total that decline! They cannot possibly be that much trouble to memorize. Goodness, we even feel the need to shorten a three letter word, "you" into a one letter abbreviation "u." How hard is it to write three letters? Or even type.
    Many people will blame this on texting. I agree that it is part of the problem, but if it is so hard to text, just e-mail. At least in e-mail you can type long things like this one. Hey, you could even type a paper over e-mail! Can you do that in texts... don't answer that, I don't want to know. One probably could if they are not sane. If I said that in front of a classroom of students, I would probably get a few of the next paper written in text-lish. I would then proceed to fail the student(s).
    We don't need to make the English language any stupider than it already is. So please continue to make your student refrain from using these abbreviations. I would probably say that for every one I see in a paper, they just lost 3% of their paper grade.

    Anyway,
    Hope that school is treating you right and hope Ruby gets used to her teeth soon.
    Love,
    Sarah


    P.S. LOL, lyk wasnt tht a gr8 commnt? oops g2g ttyl! LOL

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